Keeping the dream alive for all football players

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Keeping the dream alive for all football players

Post by admin » Sun Apr 14, 2019 9:42 am

Article by Mike Mitchell:

https://xflboard.com/news/2019/04/14/ke ... l-players/

The leap from playing college football to the pros crushes the dreams of so many players. On April 3rd, The NCAA released its research report (http://www.ncaa.org/about/resources/res ... -athletics) on the estimated probability of their athletes competing in pro sports. In regards to football, using data from 2018, only 1.6 percent of the 16,346 draft-eligible NCAA football participants made it into the NFL. 256 of these players were drafted, and a few hundred were signed onto NFL teams as undrafted free agents, with the potential of making an NFL roster in the summer. Other players were brought into NFL rookie camps with an opportunity to latch on, but the overwhelming majority of these players didn’t make those teams.

We are talking about talented young football players, many of whom have dedicated their entire youth to the game. Thousands of them every year that made the journey from high school football into college. For many, that journey ends when their college playing days are over. More than ninety-eight percent end up seeing their dreams of becoming a pro-football player die.

Football fans are excited that the NFL Draft is less than two weeks away. It’s one of the most exciting periods for College football programs, for all thirty-two NFL teams, and the fans that follow them. It’s a week that celebrates college and pro football. Over a three-day period, these entities combine for a celebration, where players achieve their dreams by graduating into the pros. If you take a step back and take a 30,000 foot view, lost in the celebration is how the vast majority of college football players are having their dreams crushed at the same time.

It’s the reality of sports and the numbers game. On the flip side, and at the same time that 254 players are being drafted into the NFL, current NFL veterans on the NFL 90-player rosters have to worry about losing their jobs and careers because a whole new group of young players are coming into the league. There are only so many spots available. The average NFL career went down last year to a shade under four years. This is a combination of injuries involved with the sport, but also the constant turnover with rosters. There are so many players in their mid to late twenties that don’t get to see their second contracts, let alone their third. Getting into the NFL is extremely difficult, and then staying in is just as hard.

All these factors are why anyone that loves football and the players, should be rooting for non-NFL pro-football leagues to exist and thrive. With the AAF’s demise, in what now feels like a really slow and miserable death, one of the avenues to continue on as a pro-football player is no more. With each day, the stories get exceedingly worse. Over a thousand employees lost their jobs, not to mention all the people who benefitted from the league’s existence, like workers at venues and local businesses. The biggest victims however are the players. For many of the executives and office workers, their careers are not over. The path is difficult, but there’s still a chance for their professional careers to continue. The football players themselves, are the true human capital for all these leagues. Without them, these leagues don’t exist or thrive. Football players have always been the human capital for NCAA football and for the NFL. There is a very small window for pro-football players to have careers. For some it ends in their twenties, and for others who are extremely lucky, in their thirties. You can be a sports executive or work in a front office until you are in your sixties, but that’s not the case for any football player who wants to continue their professional career. Time is not their friend. The countdown clock on their careers starts ticking immediately once they step on the field.

On the bright side of the AAF’s demise, as of press time, forty-nine AAF players have signed on to be a part of 90-player rosters in the NFL. That’s more than ten percent of the league’s players. It’s evidence as to why there should be more than one pro league in the United States. Not all of these players will make it onto NFL rosters or practice squads, come September’s huge 864 player cut down day, but getting game time in the AAF helped them get another chance. Some were talented enough to potentially get another shot without the AAF, but there’s no question that playing in that league helped them. 416 players all put their faith into the AAF by signing three-year non-guaranteed contracts. These contracts only allowed them to leave the league for an NFL opportunity. Unfortunately, over 300 of them are currently being prohibited from pursuing their pro playing careers outside of the NFL. Great leagues like the CFL, which has carved out its own niche and stood the test of time, are not being allowed to open the door for players to continue their pro-playing careers. Over 80 plus percent of the AAF’s 416 players will not even have a chance to play in the NFL this year. Some of the current 49 players that latched on to NFL squads, will make the league. Some won’t. These leagues exist for the betterment of football and its players.

Even the original XFL back in 2001, had several players go on to have NFL careers. Names like Tommy Maddox, Rod ‘He Hate Me’ Smart, Paris Lenon, Kevin Swayne, Bennie Anderson, Kelly Herndon, Mike Furrey, Corey Ivy, Steve Gleason, Kevin Kaesviharn, Jose Cortez, and over a dozen more all made NFL rosters, and had extended pro-playing careers, as a result of playing in the XFL. A good number of the XFL’s players that didn’t make NFL rosters after the league folded, ended up in the CFL and the Arena League. Players like Bobby Singh ended up having the distinction of winning an NFL Championship, a Grey Cup championship and an XFL Championship. There are several other success stories from the league. Players that are currently coaches in the NFL, and two starting XFL Quarterbacks are now in the college ranks: Jeff Brohm with Purdue and Tim Lester with Western Michigan. These leagues provide a gateway and an avenue for football careers to continue and survive.

Is the current XFL our final hope for a non-NFL pro league? For a long time, it appeared as if the winners of a spring pro football battle between the XFL and AAF would be the players, with both leagues employing nearly a thousand of them at the same time. With that possibility gone. the XFL, for now, is left standing. So many of these leagues have died. The odds are heavily against the XFL standing the test of time and defeating history, despite the immense amount of capital invested by the founder, who is also the funder. This is a key point that ultimately killed the AAF. Over 80 percent of all startup businesses fail. One of the central themes for them failing is that the founders aren’t the funder. They scramble for investors to buy in to something that they are not emotionally invested in. The founder may be emotionally and spiritually invested, but without the proper funding, the founders company dies.

Make no mistake about it, and while most don’t want to admit it, the XFL existing is great for the sport of football, but more importantly for the players. While the league continues to add to its football operations side, with the upcoming Team President and Head Coach hire in New York this Tuesday, it’s the players that will ultimately decide whether the league is viable. When most of the detractors of these types of leagues take shots at the talent level. We should just shrug it off and forgive them for their ignorance. The 1.6 percent of all college football players that make the NFL is what makes that league the greatest level of football talent on the planet. While there is no denying that the NFL is the absolute pinnacle of football talent and players, that doesn’t mean there are not any more players who are capable of playing good pro-football. It just means that there isn’t enough room for all of them.

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Re: Keeping the dream alive for all football players

Post by SamTheRam28 » Sun Apr 14, 2019 10:56 am

Great job on this, Mike. Really puts into perspective just how sad what happened to the AAF is. Also makes you wonder why so many people are seemingly rooting for XFL to fail.
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Re: Keeping the dream alive for all football players

Post by MikeMitchell » Sun Apr 14, 2019 11:55 am

SamTheRam28 wrote:
Sun Apr 14, 2019 10:56 am
Great job on this, Mike. Really puts into perspective just how sad what happened to the AAF is. Also makes you wonder why so many people are seemingly rooting for XFL to fail.
Thanks Sam. I appreciate it.

I really don't get why some football fans root against these leagues. They rip on these leagues for existing and then get pleasure in them failing. I get the NFL loyalty but at this point, there's no way that the NFL is ever going to be challenged for the throne. You can't beat history and culture. That's what the NCAA and NFL have over these types of leagues.

Rooting against these leagues is rooting against football players. To me, it's as simple as that. That's why even though there was a strong contingent of AAF backers who trash talked the XFL's current existence, and bragged about how they beat the XFL to the punch. I don't take any pleasure in that league being in the state it is in. That's why my Death in The Football Family article was basically a eulogy or a funeral piece. It might be a morbid way to look at it, but I see these types of leagues as inmates being on death row. They all have a death penalty attached to them. The second, they exist. It's just a matter of whether or not. They can get a stay of execution. Watching the AAF fold is basically a warning that you are next. They were just first in line.

I never root against any businesses succeeding. I don't care if it's lamp covers. Especially when it comes to a football league. They employ over a thousand people. The players and coaches amount to nearly half of that. It's like rooting for people to lose their jobs and careers. Rooting against their families being provided for. The players are the ones who suffer the worst fate when these leagues fold. They also get treated the worst. Most of the coaches are people who have been in the profession for awhile and have made a good living, and will continue to find work elsewhere. The team employees are hit hard but they can still land on their feet and use the experience as a resume builder. If you ran ticket sales or marketing for San Antonio, you are in good shape. The players are the ones who will struggle to find jobs and their window to continue being pro players closes fast.

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Re: Keeping the dream alive for all football players

Post by GDAWG » Sun Apr 14, 2019 12:19 pm

SamTheRam28 wrote:
Sun Apr 14, 2019 10:56 am
Great job on this, Mike. Really puts into perspective just how sad what happened to the AAF is. Also makes you wonder why so many people are seemingly rooting for XFL to fail.
One of the main reasons why people want to see the XFL fail is that people want to see Vince McMahon fail because of what he's done with the WWE. Outside of their "developmental" promotion known as NXT, the WWE product has not been great. Ratings and attendance are down across the board, WrestleMania 35 was way too long despite the fact it was the best one since WrestleMania 31. Vince has the tendency to change things on the fly in the WWE at the very last second, causing chaos to storylines and disgruntled employees. He also has been known to get angry at the smallest things, such as him lashing out at a former writer for his name being mentioned at the WWE Hall of Fame, this despite the fact that later on in the show, he gave WWE legend Shawn Michaels permission to say his name in the same ceremony. John Oliver recently lashed out at Vince for referring to his wrestlers as independent contractors rather than employees. This is why people are hoping that All Elite Wrestling succeeds because if it does, it forces WWE to step up their game and get better.

The developmental promotion known as NXT is always widely praised for their PPV events, known as Takeovers. They are always 2.5 hours long with 5 matches. However, Vince doesn't run NXT, that is run by his son-in-law Paul "Triple H" Levesque. It's still a part of the WWE, but Vince is hands off when it comes to NXT. This is what he's doing with the XFL, he's giving day-to-day control to Oliver Luck and the only thing he's doing is financing the league for three years. All of the hires are Luck hires, with Vince's consent.

I do fear what happens to the XFL if Vince decides to remove Oliver Luck from power. It may not be a good sign for the long term success of the league if Vince gains more power in the XFL.

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Re: Keeping the dream alive for all football players

Post by MikeMitchell » Sun Apr 14, 2019 1:27 pm

GDAWG wrote:
Sun Apr 14, 2019 12:19 pm
SamTheRam28 wrote:
Sun Apr 14, 2019 10:56 am
Great job on this, Mike. Really puts into perspective just how sad what happened to the AAF is. Also makes you wonder why so many people are seemingly rooting for XFL to fail.
One of the main reasons why people want to see the XFL fail is that people want to see Vince McMahon fail because of what he's done with the WWE. Outside of their "developmental" promotion known as NXT, the WWE product has not been great. Ratings and attendance are down across the board, WrestleMania 35 was way too long despite the fact it was the best one since WrestleMania 31. Vince has the tendency to change things on the fly in the WWE at the very last second, causing chaos to storylines and disgruntled employees. He also has been known to get angry at the smallest things, such as him lashing out at a former writer for his name being mentioned at the WWE Hall of Fame, this despite the fact that later on in the show, he gave WWE legend Shawn Michaels permission to say his name in the same ceremony. John Oliver recently lashed out at Vince for referring to his wrestlers as independent contractors rather than employees. This is why people are hoping that All Elite Wrestling succeeds because if it does, it forces WWE to step up their game and get better.

The developmental promotion known as NXT is always widely praised for their PPV events, known as Takeovers. They are always 2.5 hours long with 5 matches. However, Vince doesn't run NXT, that is run by his son-in-law Paul "Triple H" Levesque. It's still a part of the WWE, but Vince is hands off when it comes to NXT. This is what he's doing with the XFL, he's giving day-to-day control to Oliver Luck and the only thing he's doing is financing the league for three years. All of the hires are Luck hires, with Vince's consent.

I do fear what happens to the XFL if Vince decides to remove Oliver Luck from power. It may not be a good sign for the long term success of the league if Vince gains more power in the XFL.
The WWE is a whole other argument. From a business standpoint. The company has never been more profitable, despite the ratings and attendance declines. The WWE in 2017 and 2018, had the most profitable years in the history of that business and their company. 2019 will most likely top it. His crazy plan of starting his own over the top network is the envy of the streaming world. The record breaking profits is before they even announced their billion dollar tv contracts with Fox and NBC Universal. They are a billion dollar global monster. They have never been more successful financially. Even with the ratings down, they are consistently 52 weeks of the year, ranked as the top rated shows on cable. Besides the news, there's no other form of entertainment that produces 52 weeks of shows every year. The TV landscape is so much different now than it was in 2001. There are so many more viewing and entertainment options out there than there was say in 1999. People would kill to get the WWE's current ratings. TV shows brag about getting 500,000 viewers on cable, let alone 3 million that the WWE gets. You are competing with thousands of shows out there on Mondays. Most don't even crack the top 150. Most TV shows and even sports leagues have only a few months of fresh programming. The WWE is 52 weeks a year. They are a money making machine that never stops. They make so much money internationally now through advertising, licensing etc.... Their TV ratings and popularity earned them their biggest TV rights deal ever.

The negative stigma attached to wrestling has changed somewhat. It's not as bad as it used to be, despite the recent hit piece by a misinformed John Oliver. It's better now than it was back in the 90's. It's more of a family friendly product and people more openly admit to being fans of that form of entertainment. The advent of social media shows their popularity. They consistently trend high on social media for all of their events. They make money through that too. It shows how relevant their product is to advertisers and the viewing public. The WWE gets scrutinized by the people who follow their product religiously. People constantly complain and critique their storylines and the direction of the company, a lot like fans do for the NFL and their teams. It's become a business in and of itself. Just riling up fans and getting them to care so much about the product. Making them believe that Kofi Kingston is purposely being held down, while he makes millions of dollars in royalties and is crowned as champion at the end of a storyline.

I agree that there are a lot of people that don't like Vince McMahon. The narrative is that he's a crazy evil billionaire, who is out of touch. The man turned a family owned regionalized company into a global monster that is continuing to grow. He also plays a character on TV that fits what many deem to be his true self. A madman who is delusional. If he was so stupid and out of touch. He wouldn't be smart enough to put the companies future into the hands of Triple H. That was a great choice. NXT is Vince McMahon's money and investment through Triple H's vision. Credit to Paul Levesque for making it work and revolutionizing the game.

The same thing has to be done with The XFL. Vince McMahon has to be smart enough to allow the great football operations people to do their thing. McMahon's vision with the XFL is big. Reimagining the game and evolving it for the future. Making the fans a part of the game and increasing the action. Oliver Luck and his team have been entrusted in making that vision work.

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Re: Keeping the dream alive for all football players

Post by GDAWG » Sun Apr 14, 2019 2:55 pm

MikeMitchell wrote:
Sun Apr 14, 2019 1:27 pm
GDAWG wrote:
Sun Apr 14, 2019 12:19 pm
SamTheRam28 wrote:
Sun Apr 14, 2019 10:56 am
Great job on this, Mike. Really puts into perspective just how sad what happened to the AAF is. Also makes you wonder why so many people are seemingly rooting for XFL to fail.
One of the main reasons why people want to see the XFL fail is that people want to see Vince McMahon fail because of what he's done with the WWE. Outside of their "developmental" promotion known as NXT, the WWE product has not been great. Ratings and attendance are down across the board, WrestleMania 35 was way too long despite the fact it was the best one since WrestleMania 31. Vince has the tendency to change things on the fly in the WWE at the very last second, causing chaos to storylines and disgruntled employees. He also has been known to get angry at the smallest things, such as him lashing out at a former writer for his name being mentioned at the WWE Hall of Fame, this despite the fact that later on in the show, he gave WWE legend Shawn Michaels permission to say his name in the same ceremony. John Oliver recently lashed out at Vince for referring to his wrestlers as independent contractors rather than employees. This is why people are hoping that All Elite Wrestling succeeds because if it does, it forces WWE to step up their game and get better.

The developmental promotion known as NXT is always widely praised for their PPV events, known as Takeovers. They are always 2.5 hours long with 5 matches. However, Vince doesn't run NXT, that is run by his son-in-law Paul "Triple H" Levesque. It's still a part of the WWE, but Vince is hands off when it comes to NXT. This is what he's doing with the XFL, he's giving day-to-day control to Oliver Luck and the only thing he's doing is financing the league for three years. All of the hires are Luck hires, with Vince's consent.

I do fear what happens to the XFL if Vince decides to remove Oliver Luck from power. It may not be a good sign for the long term success of the league if Vince gains more power in the XFL.
The WWE is a whole other argument. From a business standpoint. The company has never been more profitable, despite the ratings and attendance declines. The WWE in 2017 and 2018, had the most profitable years in the history of that business and their company. 2019 will most likely top it. His crazy plan of starting his own over the top network is the envy of the streaming world. The record breaking profits is before they even announced their billion dollar tv contracts with Fox and NBC Universal. They are a billion dollar global monster. They have never been more successful financially. Even with the ratings down, they are consistently 52 weeks of the year, ranked as the top rated shows on cable. Besides the news, there's no other form of entertainment that produces 52 weeks of shows every year. The TV landscape is so much different now than it was in 2001. There are so many more viewing and entertainment options out there than there was say in 1999. People would kill to get the WWE's current ratings. TV shows brag about getting 500,000 viewers on cable, let alone 3 million that the WWE gets. You are competing with thousands of shows out there on Mondays. Most don't even crack the top 150. Most TV shows and even sports leagues have only a few months of fresh programming. The WWE is 52 weeks a year. They are a money making machine that never stops. They make so much money internationally now through advertising, licensing etc.... Their TV ratings and popularity earned them their biggest TV rights deal ever.

The negative stigma attached to wrestling has changed somewhat. It's not as bad as it used to be, despite the recent hit piece by a misinformed John Oliver. It's better now than it was back in the 90's. It's more of a family friendly product and people more openly admit to being fans of that form of entertainment. The advent of social media shows their popularity. They consistently trend high on social media for all of their events. They make money through that too. It shows how relevant their product is to advertisers and the viewing public. The WWE gets scrutinized by the people who follow their product religiously. People constantly complain and critique their storylines and the direction of the company, a lot like fans do for the NFL and their teams. It's become a business in and of itself. Just riling up fans and getting them to care so much about the product. Making them believe that Kofi Kingston is purposely being held down, while he makes millions of dollars in royalties and is crowned as champion at the end of a storyline.

I agree that there are a lot of people that don't like Vince McMahon. The narrative is that he's a crazy evil billionaire, who is out of touch. The man turned a family owned regionalized company into a global monster that is continuing to grow. He also plays a character on TV that fits what many deem to be his true self. A madman who is delusional. If he was so stupid and out of touch. He wouldn't be smart enough to put the companies future into the hands of Triple H. That was a great choice. NXT is Vince McMahon's money and investment through Triple H's vision. Credit to Paul Levesque for making it work and revolutionizing the game.

The same thing has to be done with The XFL. Vince McMahon has to be smart enough to allow the great football operations people to do their thing. McMahon's vision with the XFL is big. Reimagining the game and evolving it for the future. Making the fans a part of the game and increasing the action. Oliver Luck and his team have been entrusted in making that vision work.
Not disagreeing with you on most of this. The Kofi Kingston Storyline was great, but others were not. My main gripe about WrestleMania 35 was that he made the main event storyline too complex when a little simplicity was all it needed. There was no need to insert Charlotte Flair into the match or to give her the Smackdown Women's Championship, therefore bumping Asuka to the kickoff show. We could have had Ronda vs. Becky and Asuka vs. Charlotte II but instead Vince inserted Charlotte and made it a convoluted mess. Instead Asuka gets bumped to the meaningless women's battle royal on the kickoff show. We didn't need to see Finn Balor vs. Bobby Lashley for the 1,000th time at Mania, nor did we need to see Baron Corbin vs. Kurt Angle for Angle's last match. Also, Sasha Banks was in need of a Mania win as she was 0-3 coming in, but no she's 0-4 and rumors are is that she's very upset that she lost another Mania.

When Vince is hands off, things work well, like NXT and hopefully the XFL. When he's hands on, it's a disaster. The first version of the XFL was an epic disaster because he was hands on.

Plus the WWE received a lot of heat for the Saudi Arabia stuff last year.

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Re: Keeping the dream alive for all football players

Post by MikeMitchell » Sun Apr 14, 2019 3:40 pm

GDAWG wrote:
Sun Apr 14, 2019 2:55 pm
MikeMitchell wrote:
Sun Apr 14, 2019 1:27 pm
GDAWG wrote:
Sun Apr 14, 2019 12:19 pm


One of the main reasons why people want to see the XFL fail is that people want to see Vince McMahon fail because of what he's done with the WWE. Outside of their "developmental" promotion known as NXT, the WWE product has not been great. Ratings and attendance are down across the board, WrestleMania 35 was way too long despite the fact it was the best one since WrestleMania 31. Vince has the tendency to change things on the fly in the WWE at the very last second, causing chaos to storylines and disgruntled employees. He also has been known to get angry at the smallest things, such as him lashing out at a former writer for his name being mentioned at the WWE Hall of Fame, this despite the fact that later on in the show, he gave WWE legend Shawn Michaels permission to say his name in the same ceremony. John Oliver recently lashed out at Vince for referring to his wrestlers as independent contractors rather than employees. This is why people are hoping that All Elite Wrestling succeeds because if it does, it forces WWE to step up their game and get better.

The developmental promotion known as NXT is always widely praised for their PPV events, known as Takeovers. They are always 2.5 hours long with 5 matches. However, Vince doesn't run NXT, that is run by his son-in-law Paul "Triple H" Levesque. It's still a part of the WWE, but Vince is hands off when it comes to NXT. This is what he's doing with the XFL, he's giving day-to-day control to Oliver Luck and the only thing he's doing is financing the league for three years. All of the hires are Luck hires, with Vince's consent.

I do fear what happens to the XFL if Vince decides to remove Oliver Luck from power. It may not be a good sign for the long term success of the league if Vince gains more power in the XFL.
The WWE is a whole other argument. From a business standpoint. The company has never been more profitable, despite the ratings and attendance declines. The WWE in 2017 and 2018, had the most profitable years in the history of that business and their company. 2019 will most likely top it. His crazy plan of starting his own over the top network is the envy of the streaming world. The record breaking profits is before they even announced their billion dollar tv contracts with Fox and NBC Universal. They are a billion dollar global monster. They have never been more successful financially. Even with the ratings down, they are consistently 52 weeks of the year, ranked as the top rated shows on cable. Besides the news, there's no other form of entertainment that produces 52 weeks of shows every year. The TV landscape is so much different now than it was in 2001. There are so many more viewing and entertainment options out there than there was say in 1999. People would kill to get the WWE's current ratings. TV shows brag about getting 500,000 viewers on cable, let alone 3 million that the WWE gets. You are competing with thousands of shows out there on Mondays. Most don't even crack the top 150. Most TV shows and even sports leagues have only a few months of fresh programming. The WWE is 52 weeks a year. They are a money making machine that never stops. They make so much money internationally now through advertising, licensing etc.... Their TV ratings and popularity earned them their biggest TV rights deal ever.

The negative stigma attached to wrestling has changed somewhat. It's not as bad as it used to be, despite the recent hit piece by a misinformed John Oliver. It's better now than it was back in the 90's. It's more of a family friendly product and people more openly admit to being fans of that form of entertainment. The advent of social media shows their popularity. They consistently trend high on social media for all of their events. They make money through that too. It shows how relevant their product is to advertisers and the viewing public. The WWE gets scrutinized by the people who follow their product religiously. People constantly complain and critique their storylines and the direction of the company, a lot like fans do for the NFL and their teams. It's become a business in and of itself. Just riling up fans and getting them to care so much about the product. Making them believe that Kofi Kingston is purposely being held down, while he makes millions of dollars in royalties and is crowned as champion at the end of a storyline.

I agree that there are a lot of people that don't like Vince McMahon. The narrative is that he's a crazy evil billionaire, who is out of touch. The man turned a family owned regionalized company into a global monster that is continuing to grow. He also plays a character on TV that fits what many deem to be his true self. A madman who is delusional. If he was so stupid and out of touch. He wouldn't be smart enough to put the companies future into the hands of Triple H. That was a great choice. NXT is Vince McMahon's money and investment through Triple H's vision. Credit to Paul Levesque for making it work and revolutionizing the game.

The same thing has to be done with The XFL. Vince McMahon has to be smart enough to allow the great football operations people to do their thing. McMahon's vision with the XFL is big. Reimagining the game and evolving it for the future. Making the fans a part of the game and increasing the action. Oliver Luck and his team have been entrusted in making that vision work.
Not disagreeing with you on most of this. The Kofi Kingston Storyline was great, but others were not. My main gripe about WrestleMania 35 was that he made the main event storyline too complex when a little simplicity was all it needed. There was no need to insert Charlotte Flair into the match or to give her the Smackdown Women's Championship, therefore bumping Asuka to the kickoff show. We could have had Ronda vs. Becky and Asuka vs. Charlotte II but instead Vince inserted Charlotte and made it a convoluted mess. Instead Asuka gets bumped to the meaningless women's battle royal on the kickoff show. We didn't need to see Finn Balor vs. Bobby Lashley for the 1,000th time at Mania, nor did we need to see Baron Corbin vs. Kurt Angle for Angle's last match. Also, Sasha Banks was in need of a Mania win as she was 0-3 coming in, but no she's 0-4 and rumors are is that she's very upset that she lost another Mania.

When Vince is hands off, things work well, like NXT and hopefully the XFL. When he's hands on, it's a disaster. The first version of the XFL was an epic disaster because he was hands on.

Plus the WWE received a lot of heat for the Saudi Arabia stuff last year.
I don’t want to turn this into a wrestling board. There are ideas and storylines and how people are used, that can be debated. My guess is that Charlotte got the belt to have Becky win two titles. Not sure what the company is going to do with their brand split, with them going to Fox.

The Saudi deal was bad but they couldn’t break it legally or contractually. They were too far in when all that controversy happened. I retire from talking about wrestling here.

The XFL thing is an interesting point. McMahon made the mistake of trying to make a football league like his wrestling company. Which was hugely successful at the time in pop culture for being sex and violence driven. It helped draw in viewers and attendance early on but it ultimately hurt the product. Rushing into the league and not being laser focused on the football was that league’s failing.

As for McMahon’s vision. The original XFL was revolutionary from a broadcast standpoint. It was ahead of it’s time. From the audio access to the on field cameras etc... He got that part right because it’s in his DNA to be innovative and take chances. His best strengths are marketing, promotion and broadcasting. Those are the best tools in his tool box. He is a visionary. Stick to them. Let the football people make it work on the field. I think McMahon is taking this dead serious. It doesn’t mean that it will work but just putting serious capital into training facilities and headquarters for the teams operations is walking the walk of what really needs to be done.

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Re: Keeping the dream alive for all football players

Post by GDAWG » Sun Apr 14, 2019 3:53 pm

The XFL hires make me think that Oliver Luck is hiring them all but that Vince is aware of these hires. That's all we ever want from Vince in the XFL, to have Oliver Luck make the final decisions but let Vince know what those decisions are.

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Re: Keeping the dream alive for all football players

Post by tshanks » Sun Apr 14, 2019 8:17 pm

Good article. I know I've heard Oliver Luck speak these sentiments before, that there is much more football talent than there are spots in the NFL. The NFL won't ever see the XFL as a "developmental" league, but I'm sure they will offer contracts to XFL players who show they are ready for the big show, and are nearing the end of their XFL contract. This will be positive thing for the NFL, and I don't see how they wouldn't like it.
Lover of the game, and looking forward to Spring football. Reporting on the Seattle XFL franchise and the league in general.

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Re: Keeping the dream alive for all football players

Post by Firecop » Sun Apr 14, 2019 9:19 pm

Ultimately, the success or failure of the new XFL will be a two fold propsition, it will come down to TV contract(s) and the fans themselves. There is enough talent out there to field quality teams and competition; however, the fans need to be willing (and able) to tune in , turn out in numbers, and give the league time to develop. Patience and perserverence will be needed to allow time for the league to mature. 500 million sounds like a huge number and has been tossed around.... but how much per week does it cost to run a league not to mention start one up? That is a number I would like to know. Can a league of this size run for 3 years while revenues slowly build? If it does, it is because the founder is the funder, but that can't last forever, revenues must begin to flow. No matter what, I will remain a rabid XFL Seattle fan until either the bitter end or the glorious finish!

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